Fine Art

George Washington - Steel Engraving

Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, usually flat surface by cutting grooves into it with a burin. The result produces an intaglio printing plate of copper or other metal for printing images on paper resulting in prints or illustrations. These images are called engravings. Engravings is one of the oldest and most important technique in print making. The most common engraving plates are copper, copper-plate and steel.

During the 1820's steel engravings began to replace copper as the preferred medium for illustrations, but still rivaled by wood engraving and later lithography. Steel engraving produced plates with sharper, harder, more distinct lines. Also, the harder steel plates produced more longer wearing dies that could produce many copies before needing refurbishing. Commercial etching techniques gradually replaced steel engraving. It is still done today but to a much lesser extent. An exception is currency which is all steel engraved.

We are offering an antique steel engraving of George Washington from the book, "The History of the United States of America, Vol II" written by Charles Mackay (1814-1889), published by Virtue & Co. London,1860. The engraving measures 9.75 x 6.50".

# DMD-5434

$0.00


OUTLINE MAP OF THE COUNTY AND CITY OF PHILADELPHIA

Lithograph means "stone print". Invented in 1796 by Alois Senfelder, it works on the simple principle that oil and water don't mix. An image is drawn with oil, fat or wax onto the surface of a smooth, level lithographic limestone plate. The stone is treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions of the stone that were not protected by the grease based image. When the stone was moistened, those etched areas retained water; an oil based ink could then be applied and would be repelled by the water, sticking only to the original drawing. The ink would be transferred to a blank paper sheet, producing a printed page.

By 1820, lithography was widely adopted by the best artists of the century. This technique was popular because the artist could draw his own illustration directly on the lithographic stone. Prints could be made from the drawing with no intermediary such as an engraver. Accurately reproduced and then colored by hand, the resulting illustrations gave the impression of original watercolor paintings. Even with the excellent methods of color reproduction as the chromolithograph, the beauty of hand-coloring is rarely surpassed.

Offering a hand-colored lithograph from Walling and Gray's "New Topographical Atlas of the State of Pennsylvania;published by Stedman, Brown, & Lyon, Philadelphia". This picture demonstrates a map of  the County and City of Philadelphia. It is a genuine antique print dated 1872. It measures 13" x 16" and is enhanced in a lovely wood frame.

This hand-colored lithograph is conservation mounted - acid free museum quality mat and archival backing.

# 5616-832

$195.00


SHARP SHINNED HAWK

Lithograph means "stone print". Invented in 1796 by Alois Senfelder, it works on the simple principle that oil and water don't mix. An image is drawn with oil, fat or wax onto the surface of a smooth, level lithographic limestone plate. The stone is treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions of the stone that were not protected by the grease based image. When the stone was moistened, those etched areas retained water; an oil based ink could then be applied and would be repelled by the water, sticking only to the original drawing. The ink would be transferred to a blank paper sheet, producing a printed page.

Chromolithograph is a method for making multi-color prints and includes all lithographs. Lithographers developed a way to pint on flat surfaces with the use of chemicals instead of relief or intaligo printing. Depending on the number of colors present, a chromolithograph can take months to produce. The goal was to gradually build and correct a lithograph using dozens of layers to accomplish the complete picture. As a process, this was time consuming, cumbersome and contingent upon the skill of the lithographer.

Offering a Chromolithograph from Warren's "Enemies of Poultry" published by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.  This picture demonstrates a Sharp Shinned Hawk perched on a tree branch with catch. It is a genuine antique print dated 1897. It measures 13" x 16" and is enhanced in a lovely wood frame.

This Chromolithograph is conservation mounted - acid free museum quality mat and archival backing.

# 5616-720.7

$89.00


PIGEON HAWK

Lithograph means "stone print". Invented in 1796 by Alois Senfelder, it works on the simple principle that oil and water don't mix. An image is drawn with oil, fat or wax onto the surface of a smooth, level lithographic limestone plate. The stone is treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions of the stone that were not protected by the grease based image. When the stone was moistened, those etched areas retained water; an oil based ink could then be applied and would be repelled by the water, sticking only to the original drawing. The ink would be transferred to a blank paper sheet, producing a printed page.

Chromolithograph is a method for making multi-color prints and includes all lithographs. Lithographers developed a way to pint on flat surfaces with the use of chemicals instead of relief or intaligo printing. Depending on the number of colors present, a chromolithograph can take months to produce. The goal was to gradually build and correct a lithograph using dozens of layers to accomplish the complete picture. As a process, this was time consuming, cumbersome and contingent upon the skill of the lithographer.

Offering a Chromolithograph from Warren's "Enemies of Poultry" published by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.  This picture demonstrates a Pigeon Hawk perched on a tree branch. It is a genuine antique print dated 1897. It measures 13" x 16" and is enhanced in a lovely wood frame.

This Chromolithograph is conservation mounted - acid free museum quality mat and archival backing.

# 5616-722.7

$60.00


MARSH HAWK

Lithograph means "stone print". Invented in 1796 by Alois Senfelder, it works on the simple principle that oil and water don't mix. An image is drawn with oil, fat or wax onto the surface of a smooth, level lithographic limestone plate. The stone is treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions of the stone that were not protected by the grease based image. When the stone was moistened, those etched areas retained water; an oil based ink could then be applied and would be repelled by the water, sticking only to the original drawing. The ink would be transferred to a blank paper sheet, producing a printed page.

Chromolithograph is a method for making multi-color prints and includes all lithographs. Lithographers developed a way to pint on flat surfaces with the use of chemicals instead of relief or intaligo printing. Depending on the number of colors present, a chromolithograph can take months to produce. The goal was to gradually build and correct a lithograph using dozens of layers to accomplish the complete picture. As a process, this was time consuming, cumbersome and contingent upon the skill of the lithographer.

Offering a Chromolithograph from Warren's "Enemies of Poultry" published by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.  This picture demonstrates a March Hawk perched on a rock with catch. It is a genuine antique print dated 1897. It measures 13" x 16" and is enhanced in a lovely wood frame.

This Chromolithograph is conservation mounted - acid free museum quality mat and archival backing.

# 5616-763.9

$60.00


PEACH

Lithograph means "stone print". Invented in 1796 by Alois Senfelder, it works on the simple principle that oil and water don't mix. An image is drawn with oil, fat or wax onto the surface of a smooth, level lithographic limestone plate. The stone is treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions of the stone that were not protected by the grease based image. When the stone was moistened, those etched areas retained water; an oil based ink could then be applied and would be repelled by the water, sticking only to the original drawing. The ink would be transferred to a blank paper sheet, producing a printed page.

Chromolithograph is a method for making multi-color prints and includes all lithographs. Lithographers developed a way to pint on flat surfaces with the use of chemicals instead of relief or intaligo printing. Depending on the number of colors present, a chromolithograph can take months to produce. The goal was to gradually build and correct a lithograph using dozens of layers to accomplish the complete picture. As a process, this was time consuming, cumbersome and contingent upon the skill of the lithographer.

Offering a Chromolithograph from the "Yearbook of the US Department of Agriculture,1910".  This picture demonstrates a peach on stems with leaves and the peach open to show seed. It is a genuine antique print dated 1911. It measures 10.25" x 13.25" and is enhanced in a lovely cherry frame.

This Chromolithograph is conservation mounted - acid free museum quality mat and archival backing.

# 5616-767.3

$50.00


BLACKBERRIES

Lithograph means "stone print". Invented in 1796 by Alois Senfelder, it works on the simple principle that oil and water don't mix. An image is drawn with oil, fat or wax onto the surface of a smooth, level lithographic limestone plate. The stone is treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions of the stone that were not protected by the grease based image. When the stone was moistened, those etched areas retained water; an oil based ink could then be applied and would be repelled by the water, sticking only to the original drawing. The ink would be transferred to a blank paper sheet, producing a printed page.

Chromolithograph is a method for making multi-colour prints and includes all lithographs. Lithographers developed a way to pint on flat surfaces with the use of chemicals instead of relief or intaligo printing. Depending on the number of colors present, a chromolithograph can take months to produce. The goal was to gradually build and correct a lithograph using dozens of layers to accomplish the complete picture. As a process, this was time consuming, cumbersome and contingent upon the skill of the lithographer.

Offering a Chromolithograph from the "Yearbook of the US Department of Agriculture,1910".  This picture demonstrates a bunch of raspberries on stems with leaves. It is a genuine antique print dated 1911. It measures 10.25" x 13.25" and is enhanced in a lovely cherry frame.

This Chromolithograph is conservation mounted - acid free museum quality mat and archival backing.

# 5616 - 767.4

$50.00


GRAPES

Lithograph means "stone print". Invented in 1796 by Alois Senfelder, it works on the simple principle that oil and water don't mix. An image is drawn with oil, fat or wax onto the surface of a smooth, level lithographic limestone plate. The stone is treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions of the stone that were not protected by the grease based image. When the stone was moistened, those etched areas retained water; an oil based ink could then be applied and would be repelled by the water, sticking only to the original drawing. The ink would be transferred to a blank paper sheet, producing a printed page.

Chromolithograph is a method for making multi-colour prints and includes all lithographs. Lithographers developed a way to pint on flat surfaces with the use of chemicals instead of relief or intaligo printing. Depending on the number of colors present, a chromolithograph can take months to produce. The goal was to gradually build and correct a lithograph using dozens of layers to accomplish the complete picture. As a process, this was time consuming, cumbersome and contingent upon the skill of the lithographer.

Offering a Chromolithograph from the "Yearbook of the US Department of Agriculture, 1913".  This picture demonstrates two bunch of grapes on stems with leaves. It is a genuine antique print dated 1914. It measures 10.25" x 13.25" and is enhanced in a lovely cherry frame.

This Chromolithograph is conservation mounted -acid free museum quality mat and archival backing.

# 5616-662.5

$50.00


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