Accessories/Smalls

IRON DOOR STOP - CAT

Doorstops or Door Porters are simply heavy objects used to hold a door open. By the late 1700's, many homes utilized round decorative examples made of sand-cast brass, or other types of metal with flat, hollow backs. Decorative door stops were not used in American Homes until after the Civil War. Decorative iron doorstops came into their own in the United States in the 1920's and remained popular through the early 1940's when heavy metal rationing began during World War II. They are very collectible and cover a range of subjects.

Offering a black cat painted door stop which measures 7.25" tall and 5.50" Wide. This piece is painted black with white contrasting fur, nails and whiskers. It has strong detail with an expressive face. 

Overall condition is excellent, no paint loss, stands flat on surface. This is a wonderful piece to add to any decor.

# MCB 20508

$125.00


IRON DOOR STOPS - SHEAF OF WHEAT

Doorstops or Door Porters are simply heavy objects used to hold a door open. By the late 1700's, many homes utilized round decorative examples made of sand-cast brass, or other types of metal with flat, hollow backs. Decorative door stops were not used in American Homes until after the Civil War. Decorative iron doorstops came into their own in the United States in the 1920's and remained popular through the early 1940's when heavy metal rationing began during World War II. They are very collectible and cover a range of subjects.

Offering a handsome wheat bundle tied at the middle with wheat stalks. This piece has wonderful detail from the wheat seeds to the stalks. It stands on a graduated steps, giving it a good height. The overall detail is excellent, all in black iron. Perfect as a book end or desk ornament.

It is 7.75" tall ans 4" wide, in excellent condition.

# MCB 20458

$85.00


IRON DOOR STOP - MONKEY

Doorstops or Door Porters are simply heavy objects used to hold a door open. By the late 1700's, many homes utilized round decorative examples made of sand-cast brass, or other types of metal with flat, hollow backs. Decorative door stops were not used in American Homes until after the Civil War. Decorative iron doorstops came into their own in the United States in the 1920's and remained popular through the early 1940's when heavy metal rationing began during World War II. They are very collectible and cover a range of subjects.

We are offering a spider monkey door stop that is 8.5" tall. The monkey strikes a pensive pose with one hand on his cheek. He has a  very expressive face and a long curly tail wrapped in front of his feet. His other hand is placed on his knee. He is painted with various shades of brown.

This piece is in excellent condition with minor paint loss resulting from honest wear. He is a great decorative piece that would enhance any decor.

# MCB 18221

$350.00


IRON DOOR STOP -WOODPECKER

Doorstops or Door Porters are simply heavy objects used to hold a door open. By the late 1700's, many homes utilized round decorative examples made of sand-cast brass, or other types of metal with flat, hollow backs. Decorative door stops were not used in American Homes until after the Civil War. Decorative iron doorstops came into their own in the United States in the 1920's and remained popular through the early 1940's when heavy metal rationing began during World War II. They are very collectible and cover a range of subjects.

Offering a woodpecker door stop that measures 9.5"tall and 7.5" wide. The bird is clinging to a tree trunk eating insects from the bark. He is red,black and white with black tail feathers. The tree has white blossom at the bottom trunk surrounded by green leaves.

This piece is painted with crisp bright colors. It is in excellent condition with very minor paint loss due to honest wear. It has many uses and would be a great addition to any decor.

# MCB 20534

$275.00


LARD PAIL

Lard is fat from pigs, in both rendered and unrendered forms. It is a semi-soft white fat derived from the fatty parts of the pig with high saturated fat content and no trans fat. Most cuisines use lard as cooking fat or shortening. It is particularly favored for the preparation of pastry. During the 19th Century, lard was used similarly to butter in North America and Europe. It remained popular until the early 20th Century. By late 20th Century it began to be considered less healthy than vegetable oils. But today, it has made a comeback due to its low trans fat and unique culinary values.

With the advent of tin/metal cans, lard was sold in pails that advertised the butcher. Cans were quite colorful, had lids and bale handles. Soon they became collectable with many different motifs.

We are offering a blue lard pail with bale handle. Pail is 5.25" tall and 5" diameter. The front lettering reads "Kettle rendered Warrented Pure Lard Geo L. Williams  Slatendale, Pa. with a picture of a pig on top."   It is all metal,  blue with black lettering, gold lid. It is excellent condition, all seams are tight with honest wear.

# JRG 38

$59.00


LARD PAIL

Lard is fat from pigs, in both rendered and unrendered forms. It is a semi-soft white fat derived from the fatty parts of the pig with high saturated fat content and no trans fat. Most cuisines use lard as cooking fat or shortening. It is particularly favored for the preparation of pastry. During the 19th Century, lard was used similarly to butter in North America and Europe. It remained popular until the early 20th Century. By late 20th Century it began to be considered less healthy than vegetable oils. But today, it has made a comeback due to its low trans fat and unique culinary values.

With the advent of tin/metal cans, lard was sold in pails that advertised the butcher. Cans were quite colorful, had lids and bale handles. Soon they became collectable with many different motifs.

We are offering a red lard pail with bale handle. Pail is 5.25" tall and 5" diameter. The front lettering reads "Home Rendered Lard  H.C.Kehler Locust Dale, Pa."   It is all metal,  red with black lettering, gold lid. It is excellent condition, all seams are tight with honest wear.

# JRG 36

$53.00


LARD PAIL

Lard is fat from pigs, in both rendered and unrendered forms. It is a semi-soft white fat derived from the fatty parts of the pig with high saturated fat content and no trans fat. Most cuisines use lard as cooking fat or shortening. It is particularly favored for the preparation of pastry. During the 19th Century, lard was used similarly to butter in North America and Europe. It remained popular until the early 20th Century. By late 20th Century it began to be considered less healthy than vegetable oils. But today, it has made a comeback due to its low trans fat and unique culinary values.

With the advent of tin/metal cans, lard was sold in pails that advertised the butcher. Cans were quite colorful, had lids and bale handles. Soon they became collectable with many different motifs.

We are offering a blue lard pail with bale handle. Pail is 6" tall and 5.25" diameter. The front lettering reads "Kettle Rendered Lard  F.L. Winner  Lock Haven, Pa."   It is all metal, blue & red with blue lettering, gold lid. It is excellent condition, all seams are tight with honest wear.

# JRG 35

$65.00


PORCELAIN PIGS

Ceramic hot water bottles were common in the 19th and early 20th centuries. These were used to warm your bed, feet and hands. Traveling in cold weather required foot warmers as trains, carriages and sleighs were unheated. As rail travel took off, foot warmers moved into trains. Known as "porcelain pigs",they were given to passengers to ease their journey. Children sat on "Cricket" benches using them to warm their fingers. They came in many shapes and sizes and were often used for advertising.

Offering a  ceramic "porcelain pig" which is 11" tall and circa late 1800"s. The "pig is plain, has the original plug and is without advertising. It has one flat side and flat bottom.  The color is crisp and clean. The bottom and top rims are strong with out cracks or chips. It is in excellent condition.

# RHG-1405

$30.00


PORCELAIN PIGS

Ceramic hot water bottles were common in the 19th and early 20th centuries. These were used to warm your bed, feet and hands. Traveling in cold weather required foot warmers as trains, carriages and sleighs were unheated. As rail travel took off, foot warmers moved into trains. Known as "porcelain pigs",they were given to passengers to ease their journey. Children sat on "Cricket" benches using them to warm their fingers. They came in many shapes and sizes and were often used for advertising.

Offering a  ceramic "porcelain pig" which is 10" tall and circa late 1800"s. The "pig is plain, has the original plug and is without advertising. It has one flat side and flat bottom.  The color is crisp and clean. The bottom and top rims are strong with out cracks or chips. It is in excellent condition.

# RHG-1409

$30.00


WOODEN MASHERS

All though,potatoes have long been considered a European staple, potatoes are a New World Food. Native to the Americas, potatoes were introduced to Europe around 1536 by Spanish explorers.  The Incas seemed to prefer mashed potatoes. Some say the original recipe originated in 1771 when a French man Antoine Parmentier held a competition for potato recipes. Other sources say the English invented the mashed potatoes with gravy in 1600. No matter where they originated, a kitchen utensil was needed for preparation.

Probably the first potato masher was a rock or stone followed by a hand shaped masher made of wood. With the machine age of 1800's,the wood masher evolved into a hand or machine-turned mallet. Workers made mashers from left over wood - so designs and size varied. It was an additional source of income for the workers. These mashers do their job so well that no one has made changes to their basic design. It has become the most common of kitchen utensils.

Offering a fine selection of potato mashers in various sizes, All are in excellent condition and can be used as decoration or kitchen utensil. Each sells for $20.00 @.

# DMD-1711

$20.00


16 TUBE TIN CANDLE MOLD

In the 18-19th centuries, candles or lamps that burned oil lighted the entire community. Candles were made from bayberry, beeswax, fats or oils derived from whales or animals. Many candles were hand dipped, but in 1700, a few well equipped homes had candle molds. The mold had from one to 72 tin tubes, each with a narrow end. A frame held the tubes upright. A string (wick) was threaded into each tube, and the melted tallow was poured into the mold to harden. The mold gave a uniformity to the candle while saving the time of hand dipping.


We are offering a 16 tube tin antique candle mold with wick holes on the bottom and a carry handle on the back with support bar. The mold stands on a raised pedestal. The gray tin has aged to a wonderful patina. All welds are sound with intact seams. The entire piece is whole -no dents or dings which is exceptional.


The dimensions are 10"T, 11"W, 3"D .  This piece shows honest, minor wear and is in excellent condition.

# 323-4726

$123.00


6 TUBE TIN CANDLE MOLD

In the 18-19th centuries, candles or lamps that burned oil lighted the entire community. Candles were made from bayberry, beeswax, fats or oils derived from whales or animals. Many candles were hand dipped, but in 1700, a few well equipped homes had candle molds. The mold had from one to 72 tin tubes, each with a narrow end. A frame held the tubes upright. A string (wick) was threaded into each tube, and the melted tallow was poured into the mold to harden. The mold gave a uniformity to the candle while saving the time of hand dipping.


We are offering a 6 tube tin antique candle mold with wick holes on the bottom and a carry handle on the back. The mold stands on a raised pedestal. The gray tin has aged to a wonderful patina. All welds are sound with intact seams. The entire piece is whole -no dents or dings which is exceptional.


The dimensions are 9.25"T, 5"W, 3.5"D .  This piece shows honest, minor wear and is in excellent condition.

# 323-4727

$123.00


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